Coos Bay Georeferenced Bibliography

latest article added on May 2014

A bibliography of publications (theses, peer reviewed articles, gray literature and books) with sample-collections sites in the Coos Bay, Oregon area.

We compiled a geo-referenced bibliography of research including theses, peer-reviewed articles, agency literature, and books having sample collection sites in and around Coos Bay, Oregon. Using Google Earth and GeoCommons we created a map that allows users such as visiting researchers, faculty, students, and local agencies to identify previous research conducted in their location of interest. There are links to specific citations and, if available, full-text documents. The interactive map allows users to zoom and filter.


ArticleFirst AuthorPublished
Physical and Functional Responses to Experimental Marsh Surface Elevation Manipulation in Coos Bay's South Slough.Cornu, Craig E.2002

Physical and Functional Responses to Experimental Marsh Surface Elevation Manipulation in Coos Bay's South Slough.

Keywords

coastal wetland restoration, diked wetlands, marsh elevation, marsh vegetation, subsidence, tidal channels, CBGB

Abstract

Dike material was used as fill to construct high, mid, and low intertidal elevations in a subsided marsh located in the South Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Oregon. Marsh surface elevation change (including fill consolidation and compression of the original marsh soils), vertical accretion, tidal channel development, emergent vegetation colonization, and fish use were monitored over 3 years. Significant marsh surface elevation loss was detected at all elevations, with fill consolidation accounting for 70% of the loss at the highest elevation. Vertical accretion averaged 0.19 cm/yr in the sparsely vegetated Kunz Marsh compared with 0.70 cm/yr at the densely vegetated reference sites. Tidal channel development was influenced as much by marsh surface gradient as by marsh surface elevation. Vegetation colonization was directly correlated with elevation, whereas density and species richness of fish was inversely correlated with elevation. Manipulating the marsh surface to mid-marsh elevations favors rapid vegetation colonization and facilitates vertical accretion-dominated tidal channel development. Low marsh elevations result in initially slower developing vegetation colonization and channel development but are more beneficial to fish during the early stages of marsh recovery. High marsh elevations appear to sacrifice tidal channel development and associated fish access for rapid vegetation colonization.

Authors

Cornu, Craig E. and Steven Sadro.

Year Published

2002

Publication

Restoration Ecology

Locations
Doi

10.1046/j.1526-100X.2002.01035.x

Non-target effects of invasive species management: beachgrass, birds, and bulldozers in coastal dunesZarnetske, Phoebe L.2010

Non-target effects of invasive species management: beachgrass, birds, and bulldozers in coastal dunes

Keywords

Ammophila arenaria, Ammophila breviligulata, beachgrass, Charadrius alexandrinus nivosus, coastal dune, ecosystem engineer, invasive species, Oregon, restoration, targeted management, threatened species, Washington, CBGB

Abstract

Alteration of ecosystem processes by invasive species can lead to the decline of native species. Management actions targeted at removing these invaders and restoring native populations may have knock-on effects on non-target native species and ecosystems. For example, coastal dunes in the Pacific Northwest of North America are nearly monocultures of the introduced beach grasses, Ammophila arenaria and Ammophila breviligulata. These invasive grasses have converted open, low-lying sand dunes with a sparse covering of native plants to tall, densely-vegetated ridges dominated by the two invaders. As a result, the critical open-sand habitat of the federally threatened Western Snowy plover (Charadrius alexandrinus nivosus) has declined along with populations of several native dune plant species. Here we investigate how nearly 20 years of management targeted at the removal of Ammophila for plover recovery are impacting native plant species and dune morphology along 500 km of coastline in Oregon and Washington, USA. Despite increased plovers and decreased Ammophila in treated areas, plover habitat restoration also has had the unintentional effect of reducing the richness and abundance of native dune plants. Additionally, frequent Ammophila removal has prevented the re-establishment of the natural disturbance regime and dune function. Based on these findings, we suggest that the Pacific Northwest coastal dune ecosystem would benefit from a more synthetic community-wide management approach.

Authors

Zarnetske, Phoebe L., Seabloom, Eric W. and Hacker, Sally D.

Year Published

2010

Publication

Ecosphere

Locations
Doi

10.1890/ES10-00101.1

A bioassay for the toxicity of sediment to marine macrobenthosSwartz, R.1979

A bioassay for the toxicity of sediment to marine macrobenthos

Keywords

CBGB

Abstract

A bioassay has been developed to determine the acute toxicity of the settleable phase of dredged material to the marine benthos. Five benthic invertebrates representing different taxonomic and trophic positions were allowed to acclimate to control (nonpolluted) sediment and were then covered by a layer of either test or control sediment. Mean survival after 10 days of exposure was significantly different from the control for sediment from the Duwamish River (Wash.), Houston Ship Channel (Tex.), Bailey Creek (Va.), and the Raritan River (N.J.), but there was no significant difference for sediment from Coos Bay and the Skipanon River (Oreg.). There were substantial interspecific differences in survival among the five test species. The most sensitive species was the infaunal amphipod, Paraphoxus epistomus.

Authors

Swartz, R., W. DeBen, F. Cole

Year Published

1979

Publication

Journal (Water Pollution Control …

Locations
A brief description of a subtidal sabellariid(Polychaeta) reef on the southern Oregon coast.Posey, M.1984

A brief description of a subtidal sabellariid(Polychaeta) reef on the southern Oregon coast.

Keywords

CBGB

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

Posey, M., A. Pregnall, R. Graham

Year Published

1984

Publication

Pacific Science

Locations
A comparison of population structure in black rockfish ( Sebastes melanops ) as determined with otolith microchemistry and microsatellite DNAMiller, J.A.2005

A comparison of population structure in black rockfish ( Sebastes melanops ) as determined with otolith microchemistry and microsatellite DNA

Keywords

CBGB

Abstract

The black rockfish (Sebastes melanops) is a long-lived (≤50 years) viviparous species with an extended pelagic larval period (3–5 months) and a broad continental distribution. Prolonged larval periods have been assumed to lead to widespread dispersal resulting in minimal population structure. We tested this assumption by comparing otolith microchemistry and microsatellite DNA of adult black rockfish from four locations in Oregon and Washington. We observed significant differences among locations in element-to-Ca ratios (Mg:Ca, Mn:Ca, Zn:Ca, Sr:Ca, and Ba:Ca) at the otolith edge, which represented the last year of life. Discriminant function analysis, based on otolith element-to-Ca ratios classified, on average, 64% of the fish to collection location, suggesting that the majority of individuals from these locations did not mix. Using microsatellite DNA, we observed significant genetic differences among adults collected 340–460 km apart (FST = 0.018 ± 0.004). Using five and seven loci, 63% and 75% of the fish, respectively, were correctly assigned to collection location. These two techniques provided corroborative and complementary information on the population structure of S. melanops.

Authors

Miller, J.A., M.A. Banks, D. Gomez-Uchida, A.L. Shanks

Year Published

2005

Locations
Doi

10.1139/f05-133

A Concentration of the Ratfish, Hydrolagus colliel Cape Arago, OregonJopson, H.G.M.1958

A Concentration of the Ratfish, Hydrolagus colliel Cape Arago, Oregon

Keywords

CBGB

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

Jopson, H.G.M.

Year Published

1958

Publication

Copeia

Locations
Doi

10.2307/1440606

A new species of large and highly contractile hydroid in the genus Candelabrum (Hydrozoa: Anthoathecatae) from southern Oregon, U.S.A.Hewitt, C.L.2001

A new species of large and highly contractile hydroid in the genus Candelabrum (Hydrozoa: Anthoathecatae) from southern Oregon, U.S.A.

Keywords

CBGB

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

Hewitt, C.L., J.H.R. Goddard

Year Published

2001

Publication

Canadian Journal of Zoology

Locations
Doi

10.1139/cjz-79-12-2280

A new species of Penitella (family Pholadidae) from Coos Bay, OregonEvans, J.1966

A new species of Penitella (family Pholadidae) from Coos Bay, Oregon

Keywords

CBGB

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

Evans, J., D. Fisher

Year Published

1966

Locations
A non-feeding pilidium with apparent prototroch and telotroch.Maslakova, S.A.2012

A non-feeding pilidium with apparent prototroch and telotroch.

Keywords

CBGB

Abstract

The nemertean pilidium larva is a long-lived planktotrophic form which is challenging to homologize to other invertebrate larval forms. Here we report a reduced, lecithotrophic pilidium which superficially resembles a trochophore. We document the pilidium-like catastrophic metamorphosis of this larva, including devouring of the larval body. Sequences of COI and 16S rRNA show that this larva belongs to an undescribed lineiform species. This novel larval form highlights the long-standing question, is the trochophore a conserved larval ground-plan or a functional design arrived at by convergence?

Authors

Maslakova, S.A., G. von Dassow

Year Published

2012

Publication

Journal of experimental zoology. Part B, Molecular and developmental evolution

Locations
Doi

10.1002/jezb.22467

A Study of bait seine fisheries of OregonHarry, G.Y.J.1951

A Study of bait seine fisheries of Oregon

Keywords

CBGB

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

Harry, G.Y.J.

Year Published

1951

Publication

Fish Commission of Oregon Research Briefs

Locations
Abundance and Distribution of Harbor Seals (Phoca vitulina) in Oregon, 1975-1983Harvey, J.T.1990

Abundance and Distribution of Harbor Seals (Phoca vitulina) in Oregon, 1975-1983

Keywords

CBGB

Abstract

Harbor seals were observed on 32 haulout sites in Oregon during aerial counts conducted from 1975 to 1983; 90% were seen on 14 sites. The greatest number of seals seen on a haulout was 985 recorded at Cape Arago in July 1982. Counts of harbor seals in 1982 and 1983 were 38.6% greater than counts from 1975 to 1980. These data indicate an increase in numbers of harbor seals in Oregon, an increase corroborated by other information, namely, lower counts made before 1975 and increased use of new haulout sites since 1975. Between 1975 and 1983, numbers within bays increased, whereas numbers on most offshore rocks remained somewhat constant. Decreased harassment and mortality since implementation of the Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972 doubtless allowed harbor seals to increase in numbers and to reoccupy protected haulout sites in bays.

Authors

Harvey, J.T., R.F. Brown, B.R. Mate

Year Published

1990

Publication

Northwestern Naturalist

Locations
Doi

10.2307/3536774

Abundance and distribution of larval and juvenile fish in Coos Bay, Oregon: time-series analysis based on light-trap collectionsMiller, J.2005

Abundance and distribution of larval and juvenile fish in Coos Bay, Oregon: time-series analysis based on light-trap collections

Keywords

CBGB

Abstract

Recent interest in the role of estuaries as ‘essential fish habitat’ has led to more precise definitions and quantitative assessments of estuaries as nursery habitat. Although the larvae and juveniles of > 20 fish species are found in Pacific Northwest estuaries, information on their presence in and use of Oregon’s estuaries is scarce. The objectives of this study were to use a long-term time series (3.75 yr) of high-frequency (every 1-2 d) light-trap collections from Coos Bay, Oregon to document species diversity, compare intra- and interannual patterns of species abundance and size, and identify potential wind- and/or tidally-driven transport mechanisms. Thirty-five taxa (28 species) of larval and juvenile fish were identified. Five species consistently comprised > 70 % of the catch. On average, the majority (94 +/- 6 % SD) of the catch at the most ocean-dominated site occurred during the downwelling season (1 October to 31 May) with 1.5 to 62 % of that catch collected during the spring transition (1 April to 31 May) when conditions shift from predominantly downwelling to upwelling conditions. Conversely, < 1 km farther up estuary an average of 64 +/- 12.7 % SD of the catch occurred during downwelling conditions with only 8% during the spring transition. Relative abundance patterns indicate seasonal and spatial variation in estuarine use and potentially extended residence periods for some species, Time-series analyses indicate the presence of the larval and juvenile fish collected in the estuary may have been primarily regulated by a combination of tidally-driven transport and reproductive timing with less evidence for wind-driven transport.

Authors

Miller, J., A. Shanks

Year Published

2005

Locations
Doi

10.3354/meps305177

Adaptive design of locomotion and foot form in prosobranch gastropodsMiller, S.L.1974

Adaptive design of locomotion and foot form in prosobranch gastropods

Keywords

CBGB

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

Miller, S.L.

Year Published

1974

Locations
Doi

10.1016/0022-0981(74)90021-5

Additional opistobranch mollusks from Oregon, with a review of deep-water records and observations on the fauna of the south coastGoddard, J.H.R.1990

Additional opistobranch mollusks from Oregon, with a review of deep-water records and observations on the fauna of the south coast

Keywords

CBGB

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

Goddard, J.H.R.

Year Published

1990

Locations
An earthquake history derived from stratigraphic and microfossil evidence of relative sea-level change at Coos Bay, southern coastal OregonNelson, A.R.1996
An Outbreak of Probable Leptospirosis in California Sea Lions along the Oregon Coast during Fall 1984Hodder, J.1992

An Outbreak of Probable Leptospirosis in California Sea Lions along the Oregon Coast during Fall 1984

Keywords

CBGB

Abstract

California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) experience periodic outbreaks of the bacterial disease leptospirosis causing death and debilitation. In fall 1984, an outbreak of presumed leptospirosis occurred during the northward migration of male California sea lions. The assumption that Leptospira bacterium was present was strengthened by positive serology and demonstration of organisms using silver staining techniques in the kidneys of three animals from Oregon. Systematic beach surveys and reports of dead and debilitated sea lions on beaches were used to estimate the mortality of Zalophus during their northward migration off Oregon. From August 1984 to February 1985, 252 male Zalophus ranging in age from 2 to 13 years were found dead on the beaches of Oregon. The number of animals found dead represent approximately 15% of the total animals seen on haul-out sites during peak northern migration off Oregon.

Authors

Hodder, J., J.T. Harvey, M.R. Graybill, R.F. Brown, B. Ebberts

Year Published

1992

Publication

Northwestern Naturalist

Locations
Doi

10.2307/3536687

Apparent oceanographic triggers to the spawning of the limpet Lottia digitalis (Rathke)Shanks, A.L.1998
Aspects of nitrogen metabolism in the terebellid polychaete Pista pacifica BerkeleyO’Malley, K.L.1975

Aspects of nitrogen metabolism in the terebellid polychaete Pista pacifica Berkeley

Keywords

CBGB

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

O’Malley, K.L., R.C. Terwilliger

Year Published

1975

Locations
Doi

10.1016/S0300-9629(75)80102-2

Aspects of osmotic and ionic regulation in the sturgeonPotts, W.1972

Aspects of osmotic and ionic regulation in the sturgeon

Keywords

CBGB

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

Potts, W., P. Rudy

Year Published

1972

Publication

Journal of Experimental Biology

Locations
Assemblages of U.S. West Coast Estuaries Based on the Distribution of FishesMonaco, M.E.1992

Assemblages of U.S. West Coast Estuaries Based on the Distribution of Fishes

Keywords

CBGB

Abstract

Principal component analysis (PCA) was conducted on a data matrix representing presence or absence of 360 adult and juvenile fish species in twenty-eight estuaries ranging from Puget Sound. WA to Tijuana, CA. The data matrix included published and unpublished information for each species/estuary combination and consultation with local fishery experts on specific estuaries. The PCA identified six estuarine components that explained 72% of the variation in the data: (1) Northern Riverine Group; (2) Southern California Group; (3) Northern Estuarine Group; (4) Central Marine Group; (5) Fjord Group; and (6) Coastal Northwest Group. Species assemblages for each estuarine group were identified and used as surrogate habitat indicators to compare and contrast groups of estuaries. Stepwise multiple regressions of estuarine physical characteristics identified estuary mouth depth and area of the seawater zone as significant predictors of the number of fish species per estuary. These estuarine physical parameters appear to influence access and diversity of estuarine habitats and ultimately the number of fish species occurring within an estuary.

Authors

Monaco, M.E., T.A. Lowery, R.L. Emmett

Year Published

1992

Publication

Journal of Biogeography

Locations
Doi

10.2307/2845450

Association and distribution of the ciliate Orchitophrya stellarum with asteriid sea stars on the west coast of North America.Stickle, W.B.2008

Association and distribution of the ciliate Orchitophrya stellarum with asteriid sea stars on the west coast of North America.

Keywords

CBGB

Abstract

The association of the scuticociliate Orchitophrya stellarum with 3 species of asteriid sea stars from the west coast of North America was studied by flushing the gonopore region with seawater and spawning the sea stars, along a latitudinal gradient of 2549 km between Pigeon Point, California, and Kodiak, Alaska. Asterias forbesii and A. rubens from the Isles of Shoals, New Hampshire (east coast), were also sampled. The ciliate was found on the aboral surface of both sexes of reproductively ripe Evasterias troschelii, Leptasterias spp., and Pisaster ochraceus with a maximum intensity of association occurring at Cape Arago, Oregon, and Clallum Bay and Manchester Dock, Washington. A survey of gonad smears and hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections indicated that the ciliate was only present in males. Spring-spawning E. troschelii and P. ochraceus are more negatively impacted by the ciliate than are winter-spawning Leptasterias spp. as judged by a skewed sex ratio and sex size differences, which may be associated with seasonal differences in water temperature affecting the growth rate of O. stellarum. The external morphology of O. stellarum appears to be similar throughout the geographical range surveyed.

Authors

Stickle, W.B., E.N. Kozloff

Year Published

2008

Publication

Diseases of aquatic organisms

Locations
Doi

10.3354/dao01917

Ballast water as a vector for tintinnid transportPierce, R.1997

Ballast water as a vector for tintinnid transport

Keywords

CBGB

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

Pierce, R., J. Carlton, D. Carlton, J. Geller

Year Published

1997

Locations
Doi

10.3354/meps149295

Barnacle settlement versus recruitment as indicators of larval delivery. I. Effects of post-settlement mortality and recruit densityShanks, A.2009
Barnacle settlement versus recruitment as indicators of larval delivery. II. Time-series analysis and hypothesized delivery mechanismsShanks, A.2009
Benthic infauna and maintenance dredging: A case studyMcCauley, J.E.1977

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