Collection of published works by members of the Southwest Chapter of the Ecological Society of America

Description

This collection was established to engage Southwest Chapter members and facilitate interaction between them and to enhance discovery of relevant ecological research.

latest article added on December 2013

ArticleFirst AuthorPublished
Differential performance of reciprocal hybrids in multiple environmentsKimball, Sarah2008

Differential performance of reciprocal hybrids in multiple environments

Keywords

cytoplasmic genes, elevational gradient, genotype-by-environment interactions, hybridization, hybrid zones, local adaptation, Penstemon , reciprocal transplant experiment, Sierra Nevada

Abstract

1. Closely related taxa may be maintained as distinct species by a variety of reproductive isolating mechanisms. These include: inability to produce hybrid offspring, endogenous selection against hybrids in the form of genomic incompatibilities, and exogenous selection observable in genotypeby- environment interactions. To understand the relative importance of these three isolating mechanisms, we performed hand-pollination and reciprocal transplant experiments in a natural plant hybrid zone. 2. We measured reproductive isolation by making crosses between two parent species of Penstemon and naturally occurring hybrids. Inclusion of reciprocal hybrid crosses allowed us to determine whether fitness components differed depending on the identity of the mother. 3. Hybrid performance was evaluated in the greenhouse and in a reciprocal transplant experiment in the field. We measured fruit set, seed set, seed weight, time required for fruits to mature and seedling growth for potted plants. To test for exogenous isolation, we planted pure parents, reciprocal F 1 hybrids and later generation hybrids in a reciprocal transplant experiment, and measured survival. 4. On average, interspecific crosses produced as many seeds as conspecific crosses. Hybrid performance was also equal to or greater than parents in all environments, including the greenhouse and all field gardens, indicating a lack of endogenous isolation. Parent species and reciprocal F 1 hybrids differed in many traits measured. In each field garden, the hybrid with the native cytoplasm had a higher survival rate, suggesting local adaptation to different elevations. 5. Synthesis . Exogenous factors that differ along elevational gradients can be more important than intrinsic genetic incompatibilities in determining the fitness of plant hybrids. Our results illustrate the importance of studying hybrid performance in multiple environments and in generating reciprocal hybrids to test for isolating mechanisms in natural hybrid zones.

Authors

Kimball, Sarah, Campbell, Diane R. and Lessin, Carrie

Year Published

2008

Publication

Journal of Ecology

Locations
DOI

10.1111/j.1365-2745.2008.01432.x

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