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One of the largest bibliographies of sage grouse literature available online

Description

The greater sage-grouse, a candidate species for listing under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973 has experienced population declines across its range in the sagebrush steppe ecosystems of western North America. Sage-grouse now occupy only 56% of their pre-settlement range, though they still occur in 11 western states and 2 Canadian provinces.

latest article added on August 2013

ArticleFirst AuthorPublished
OBSERVATIONS OF THE FORMATION OF A SAGE GROUSE LEKGATES, RJ1985

OBSERVATIONS OF THE FORMATION OF A SAGE GROUSE LEK

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

GATES, RJ

Year Published

1985

Publication

Wilson Bulletin

Locations
Differential Survival by Sex in Juvenile Sage Grouse and Gray PartridgeSWENSON, JE1986

Differential Survival by Sex in Juvenile Sage Grouse and Gray Partridge

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

Studies of Capercaillie Tetrao urogallus and Black Grouse T. tetrix in Northern Eu- rope have found that juvenile males of these sexually size dimorphic species suffer higher mortality than juvenile females during adverse conditions. This difference may be due to the more rapid growth rates among males. Differences in the juvenile survi- val of the dimorphic Sage Grouse Centrocercus urophasianus and the monomorphic Gray Partridge Perdix perdix were studied in western North America. Juvenile male Sage Grouse survive less well than juvenile females during years unfavorable for ju- venile survival and in poorer habitats. Juvenile male Gray Partridge showed little or no such trend. These results are consistent with those obtained in the European stud- ies. Pressures of sexual selection may have led to a growth rate in juvenile males of highly dimorphic grouse species which is near the upper limit of that which can be sustained by their ecological niche

Authors

SWENSON, JE

Year Published

1986

Publication

Ornis Scandinavica

Locations
DOI

10.2307/3676747

Summer Habitat Use by Adult Female and Juvenile Sage GrouseDUNN, PO1986

Summer Habitat Use by Adult Female and Juvenile Sage Grouse

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

DUNN, PO; BRAUN, CE

Year Published

1986

Publication

The Journal of Wildlife Management

Locations
DOI

10.2307/3801903

LATE SUMMER SPRING MOVEMENTS OF JUVENILE SAGE GROUSEDUNN, PO1986

LATE SUMMER SPRING MOVEMENTS OF JUVENILE SAGE GROUSE

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

ate summer to early spring movements of radio-marked juvenile Sage Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) were studied on Cold Spring Mountain, northwestern Colorado, from July to February 1981-82 and August to May 1982-83. Movements were analyzed from 118 locations (N = 8 grouse) during July-November 1981 and 213 locations (N = 10 grouse) during August-November 1982. Grouse steadily moved away from capture sites until November each year when they moved to winter-use sites. Movements to wintering areas in late November were related to snowfall and subsequent availability of sagebrush. Maximum one-way distance to wintering areas was 30.3 km (N = 4 radio-marked grouse). Sage Grouse generally followed topographic features and avoided areas without sagebrush cover, although they were capable of long-distance (23 km) movements over areas without shrub cover. During spring recruitment there appeared to be roving groups of males, probably yearlings, that spent much of the breeding season displaying near females away from tra- ditional leks

Authors

DUNN, PO; BRAUN, CE

Year Published

1986

Publication

Wilson Bulletin

Locations
Decrease of sage grouse Centrocerus urophasianus after ploughing of sagebrush steppeSWENSON, JE1987

Decrease of sage grouse Centrocerus urophasianus after ploughing of sagebrush steppe

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

The effects on wildlife of ploughing sagebrush Artemisia spp. steppe have been little studied. From 1973 to 1984, numbers of lekking male sage grouse Centrocerus urophasianus declined by 73% in a study area of south central Montana, 16% of which was ploughed by 1984. The proportion of ploughed wintering areas increased from 10% in 1975 to 30% in 1984. In contrast, numbers of lekking male sage grouse on a nearby unploughed control area showed no clear long-term trend. Ploughing even small areas of sagebrush steppe to produce cereal grains appears more detrimental to sage grouse than chemical control of sagebrush.

Authors

SWENSON, JE; SIMMONS, CA; EUSTACE, CD

Year Published

1987

Publication

Biological Conservation

Locations
DOI

10.1016/0006-3207(87)90115-7

SAGE GROUSE USE OF SNOW BURROWS IN NORTHEASTERN NEVADABACK, GN1987

SAGE GROUSE USE OF SNOW BURROWS IN NORTHEASTERN NEVADA

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

BACK, GN; BARRINGTON, MR; MCADOO, JK

Year Published

1987

Publication

Wilson Bulletin

Locations
LEK ORGANIZATION IN SAGE GROUSE - VARIATIONS ON A TERRITORIAL THEMEGIBSON, RM1987

LEK ORGANIZATION IN SAGE GROUSE - VARIATIONS ON A TERRITORIAL THEME

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

During a 5-year study of sage grouse (Centrocercus urphasianus) in eastern California, displaying males abandoned territoriality througout one breeding season and did so intermittently in three others. Abandonment followed a severe winter and was correlated with a change from location-dependent to hierarchical dominance relationships between males. Intermittent territorial breakdowns occurred when males left their territories to approach and, in 2 years, to mate with females off the lek. These observations imply that the social mechanisms of sexual selection may vary between leks in the species and suggest a novel function for lek territoriality: territories may act as rendezvous sites with females.

Authors

GIBSON, RM; BRADBURY, JW

Year Published

1987

Publication

The Auk: Ornithological Advances

Locations
CARCASS COMPOSITION AND ENERGY RESERVES OF SAGE GROUSE DURING WINTERREMINGTON, TE1988

CARCASS COMPOSITION AND ENERGY RESERVES OF SAGE GROUSE DURING WINTER

Keywords

Sage Grouse; carcass composition; Centrocercus urophasianus; Colorado; fat content; energy reserves; winter

Abstract

Carcass composition of Sage Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) was measured to assess the size and variation of energy reserves during winter in North Park, Colorado. Fat content ranged from 0.8 to 8.4%. Adults had higher (P=0.001) fat content than yearlings (4.7 v. 2.9%); birds collected in 1982 had more (P<0.05) when diethyl ether, rather than petroleum ether, was used as a solvent (4.0 v. 3.6%). Fat comprised 85 to 93% of estimated energy reserves which equaled 9.6, 5.1, 7.0, and 5.3 times standard metabolic rate for adult and yearling males and adult and yearling females, respectively. All age and sex classes gained or maintained weight and fat over winter. Relatively small energy reserves of Sage Grouse are probably most important during breeding and nesting activities.

Authors

REMINGTON, TE; BRAUN, CE

Year Published

1988

Publication

The Condor: Ornithological Applications

Locations
DOI

10.2307/1368427

SEASONAL MOVEMENTS OF SAGE GROUSE IN SOUTHEASTERN IDAHOCONNELLY, JW1988

SEASONAL MOVEMENTS OF SAGE GROUSE IN SOUTHEASTERN IDAHO

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

We studied seasonal movements of sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) on, and adjacent to, the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in southeastern Idaho from summer 1977 through fall 1983. The study area included a mountain valley and sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) lowlands. Sage grouse used contiguous areas for wintering and breeding but moved as far as 82 km from winter and breeding areas to summer range. Juvenile sage grouse (n = 32) moved a mean distance of 14.9 km from summer to winter ranges and adult grouse (n = 33) moved a mean distance of 11.3 km. Male sage grouse from the mountain- valley population moved farther to summer range than did mountain-valley females and both sexes from lowland populations (P < 0.05). Movements by male and female sage grouse during fall were generally slow and meandering. Movements by females during spring were also slow and meandering compared to the relatively rapid and direct movements by males. Distances moved were not entirely influenced by the proximity of seasonal habitats, suggesting that seasonal movements tend to be traditional. Sage grouse pop- ulations should be defined on a temporal and geographic basis. Protection of sagebrush habitats within a 3.2 km radius of leks may not be sufficient to ensure the protection of year-long habitat requirement

Authors

CONNELLY, JW; BROWERS, HW; GATES, RJ

Year Published

1988

Publication

Journal of Wildlife Management

Locations
DOI

10.2307/3801070

SELECTION OF BIG SAGEBRUSH BY SAGE GROUSEWELCH B L1988

SELECTION OF BIG SAGEBRUSH BY SAGE GROUSE

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

Feeding sites of wintering sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) were located, one each in stands of three subspecies of big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata: ssp. tridentata, basin; ssp. vaseyana, mountain, and spp. wyomingensis. Wyoming [USA]). Evidences of differential use of plants within subspecies were observed. Whole leaves from fed-on and nonfed-on big sagebrush plants were examined for intrasubspecies chemical comparisons of crude protein, phosphorus, in vitro digestibility, and monoterpenoids. No significant differences were detected except for in vitro digestibility of Wyoming fed-on and nonfed-on big sagebrush and monoterpenoid content of basin big sagebrush. Nutritive content of all three subspecies was high, which may in part help to explain wintering sage grouse weight gains.

Authors

WELCH B L; PEDERSON J C; RODRIGUEZ R L

Year Published

1988

Publication

Great Basin Naturalist

Locations

Recent Articles

The Secret Sex Lives of Sage-Grouse: Multiple Paternity and Intraspecific Nest Parasitism Revealed Through Genetic Analysis

by Bird, Krista, Aldridge, Cameron, Carpenter, Jennifer, Paszkowski, Cynthia, Boyce, Mark and Coltman, David

In lek-based mating systems only a few males are expected to obtain the majority of matings in a single breeding season and multiple mating is believed to be rare. We used 13 microsatellites to genotype greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) samples from 604 adults and 1206 offspring from 191 clutches (1999-2006) from Alberta, Canada, to determine paternity and polygamy (males and fema...

published 2013 in Behavioral Ecology

Seasonal Reproductive Costs Contribute to Reduced Survival of Female Greater Sage-grouse

by Blomberg, Erik, Sedinger, James, Nonne, Daniel and Atamian, Michael

Tradeoffs among demographic traits are a central component of life history theory. We investigated tradeoffs between reproductive effort and survival in female greater sage-grouse breeding in the American Great Basin, while also considering reproductive heterogeneity by examining covariance among current and future reproductive success. We analyzed survival and reproductive histories from 328 i...

published 2013 in Journal of Avian Biology


Greater Sage-Grouse and Severe Winter Conditions: Identifying Habitat for Conservation

by Dzialak, Matthew, Webb, Stephen, Harju, Seth, Olson, Chad, Winstead, Jeffrey and Hayden Wing, Larry

d Developing sustainable rangeland management strategies requires solution-driven research that addresses ecological issues within the context of regionally important socioeconomic concerns. A key sustainability issue in many regions of the world is conserving habitat that buffers animal populations from climatic variability, including seasonal deviation from long-term precipitation or temperat...

published 2013 in Rangeland Ecology & Management

Using Spatial Statistics and Point-Pattern Simulations to Assess the Spatial Dependency Between Greater Sage-Grouse and Anthropogenic Features

by Gillan, Jeffrey K., Strand, Eva K., Karl, Jason W., Reese, Kerry P. and Laninga, Tamara

The greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus; hereafter, sage-grouse), a candidate species for listing under the Endangered Species Act, has experienced population declines across its range in the sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) steppe ecosystems of western North America. One factor contributing to the loss of habitat is the expanding human population with associated development and infrast...

published 2013 in Wildlife Society Bulletin