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One of the largest bibliographies of sage grouse literature available online

Description

The greater sage-grouse, a candidate species for listing under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973 has experienced population declines across its range in the sagebrush steppe ecosystems of western North America. Sage-grouse now occupy only 56% of their pre-settlement range, though they still occur in 11 western states and 2 Canadian provinces.

latest article added on August 2013

ArticleFirst AuthorPublished
Endogenous Reserves of Adult Male Sage Grouse during CourtshipHUPP, JW1989

Endogenous Reserves of Adult Male Sage Grouse during Courtship

Keywords

Avian energetics; breeding behavior; Centrocercus urophasianus; Colorado; lipids; Sage Grouse

Abstract

Lipid reserves of 116 adult (> 1 year of age) male Sage Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) were evaluated in two Colorado populations during lek attendance between 1983 and 1986. Lipid reserves following winters (November-March) with snowfalls < 0.001) than reserves following winters with snowfalls > 160 cm. Lipid reserves during early courtship were larger than reserves during late courtship (P < 0.001). Males catabolized lipids during courtship but did not use breast muscle protein. Catabolism of lipids likely provides < 5% of male energetic requirements during courtship. An adaptive advantage to fat deposition before breeding may exist if males primarily mobilize lipids during the peak period of female lek attendance when male reproductive success is determined, or during periods when thermoregulatory costs are high due to low ambient temperatures or wind.

Authors

HUPP, JW; BRAUN, CE

Year Published

1989

Publication

The Condor: Ornithological Applications

Locations
DOI

10.2307/1368303

Dispersion of displaying male sage grouseBRADBURY, JW1989

Dispersion of displaying male sage grouse

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

The degree to which male sage grouse select lek sites and females select nesting sites to maximize proximity to the other sex was examined by contrasting male dispersions with the dispersions and movements of females in the months preceeding incubation. Wintering females exhibit highly overlapping ranges due to shared use of central refuging areas. In late winter and early spring, females move an average 9 km from wintering areas to select nest sites and males begin occupying leks. Pooled evidence suggests that females select nest sites independently of male dispersion whereas males adjust lek occupation so as to maximize proximity to females. Relevant observations include females visiting nest sites before leks, moving further to select a nest site than to select a lek, and increasing their distance to leks as a result of selecting nest sites. In addition, males avoid leks until females have moved to within 5 km of the arenas, abandon early season leks as local female densities drop, and exhibit dispersions in which mean ratios of females/male are similar across leks. Contrasts between predicted and observed dispersions of males showed that hotspot settlement models are adequate to explain male dispersions on very coarse scales (2 km or greater); on finer scales, habitat preferences of males and tendencies for males to cluster tightly must be invoked in addition to hotspots to explain specific lek sitings.

Authors

BRADBURY, JW; GIBSON, RM; MCCARTHY, CE; VEHRENCAMP, SL

Year Published

1989

Publication

Behavioral Ecology And Sociobiology

Locations
DOI

10.1007/BF00300113

TOPOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTION OF SAGE GROUSE FORAGING IN WINTERHUPP, JW1989

TOPOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTION OF SAGE GROUSE FORAGING IN WINTER

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

We studied sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) exposure above snow and topographic distribution of sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) foraging sites in winter (Jan-Mar) in the Gunnison Basin, Colorado. Sage grouse feeding activity (n = 157 foraging sites) was not proportionally distributed among 5 topographic categories (P < 0.001). Most (46 and 75% of foraging sites in 1985 and 1986, respectively) feeding activity occurred in drainages and on slopes with south or west aspects. Use of slopes with north or east aspects was less than expected. Distribution of sage grouse feeding activity was influenced by topographic variation in snow depth and mountain big sagebrush (A. tridentata vaseyana) exposure above snow. During a severe winter in 1984, <10% of the sagebrush vegetation in the Gunnison Basin was exposed above snow and available to sage grouse. During milder winters in 1985 and 1986, exposure of sagebrush was 84 and 79%, respectively. We recommend that sagebrush be maintained in drainages and on slopes with south or west aspects.

Authors

HUPP, JW; BRAUN, CE

Year Published

1989

Publication

Journal of Wildlife Management

Locations
DOI

10.2307/3809220

Effects of Organophosphorus Insecticides on Sage Grouse in Southeastern IdahoBLUS, LJ1989

Effects of Organophosphorus Insecticides on Sage Grouse in Southeastern Idaho

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

Die-offs of sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) were verified in southeastern Idaho in 1981. We captured 82 apparently healthy grouse to quantify the effects of organophosphorus insecticides (OP's) and other pesticides on sage grouse in sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) bordering agricultural lands in July 1985 and 1986. Grouse were fitted with radio collars and tracked through part of each summer. At least 18% of 82 radio-tagged grouse in 1985-86 subsequently occupied fields at the time they were sprayed with OP insecticides dimethoate or methamidophos. Cholinesterase (ChE) assays of brains and residue analysis of crop contents indicated that 5 and 16% of the marked sample died from OP's in 1985 and 1986, respectively. Approximately 200 sage grouse were present in a block of alfalfa sprayed with dimethoate; 63 of these were later found dead and ChE activity in 43 brains suitable for assay were depressed >50%. Maximum residues in crop contents of dead grouse were 18 Ag/g methamidophos and 30 g/g dimethoate. Intoxicated or dead grouse were observed in or near 6 fields sprayed with dimethoate or methamidophos in 1985-86. Twenty of 31 intoxicated grouse radiotagged after being found in dimethoate-sprayed (1986) alfalfa died. Our study indicates that certain pesticides have the potential for adversely affecting grouse populations.

Authors

BLUS, LJ; STALEY, CS; HENNY, CJ; PENDLETON, GW; CRAIG, TH; CRAIG, EH; HALFORD, DK

Year Published

1989

Publication

The Journal of Wildlife Management

Locations
DOI

10.2307/3809623

THE ENERGETIC COST OF DISPLAY IN MALE SAGE GROUSEVEHRENCAMP, SL1989

THE ENERGETIC COST OF DISPLAY IN MALE SAGE GROUSE

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

VEHRENCAMP, SL; BRADBURY, JW; GIBSON, RM

Year Published

1989

Publication

Animal Behaviour

Locations
HABITAT USE BY BREEDING MALE SAGE GROUSE - A MANAGEMENT APPROACHELLIS, KL1989

HABITAT USE BY BREEDING MALE SAGE GROUSE - A MANAGEMENT APPROACH

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

ELLIS, KL; PARRISH, JR; MURPHY, JR; RICHINS, GH

Year Published

1989

Publication

Great Basin Naturalist

Locations
COMPARISON OF SAGE AND SHARP-TAILED GROUSE LEKS IN SOUTH CENTRAL WYOMINGKLOTT, JH1989

COMPARISON OF SAGE AND SHARP-TAILED GROUSE LEKS IN SOUTH CENTRAL WYOMING

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

KLOTT, JH; LINDZEY, FG

Year Published

1989

Publication

Great Basin Naturalist

Locations
MONOTERPENOID CONTENT OF SAGE GROUSE INGESTAWELCH, BL1989

MONOTERPENOID CONTENT OF SAGE GROUSE INGESTA

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

WELCH, BL; PEDERSON, JC; RODRIGUEZ, RL

Year Published

1989

Publication

Journal of Chemical Ecology

Locations
DISPERSION OF DISPLAYING MALE SAGE GROUSE .1. PATTERNS OF TEMPORAL VARIATIONBRADBURY, JW1989

DISPERSION OF DISPLAYING MALE SAGE GROUSE .1. PATTERNS OF TEMPORAL VARIATION

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

BRADBURY, JW; VEHRENCAMP, SL; GIBSON, RM

Year Published

1989

Publication

Behavioral Ecology And Sociobiology

Locations
FIELD PLAYBACK OF MALE DISPLAY ATTRACTS FEMALES IN LEK BREEDING SAGE GROUSEGIBSON, RM1989

FIELD PLAYBACK OF MALE DISPLAY ATTRACTS FEMALES IN LEK BREEDING SAGE GROUSE

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

GIBSON, RM

Year Published

1989

Publication

Behavioral Ecology And Sociobiology

Locations

Recent Articles

The Secret Sex Lives of Sage-Grouse: Multiple Paternity and Intraspecific Nest Parasitism Revealed Through Genetic Analysis

by Bird, Krista, Aldridge, Cameron, Carpenter, Jennifer, Paszkowski, Cynthia, Boyce, Mark and Coltman, David

In lek-based mating systems only a few males are expected to obtain the majority of matings in a single breeding season and multiple mating is believed to be rare. We used 13 microsatellites to genotype greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) samples from 604 adults and 1206 offspring from 191 clutches (1999-2006) from Alberta, Canada, to determine paternity and polygamy (males and fema...

published 2013 in Behavioral Ecology

Seasonal Reproductive Costs Contribute to Reduced Survival of Female Greater Sage-grouse

by Blomberg, Erik, Sedinger, James, Nonne, Daniel and Atamian, Michael

Tradeoffs among demographic traits are a central component of life history theory. We investigated tradeoffs between reproductive effort and survival in female greater sage-grouse breeding in the American Great Basin, while also considering reproductive heterogeneity by examining covariance among current and future reproductive success. We analyzed survival and reproductive histories from 328 i...

published 2013 in Journal of Avian Biology


Greater Sage-Grouse and Severe Winter Conditions: Identifying Habitat for Conservation

by Dzialak, Matthew, Webb, Stephen, Harju, Seth, Olson, Chad, Winstead, Jeffrey and Hayden Wing, Larry

d Developing sustainable rangeland management strategies requires solution-driven research that addresses ecological issues within the context of regionally important socioeconomic concerns. A key sustainability issue in many regions of the world is conserving habitat that buffers animal populations from climatic variability, including seasonal deviation from long-term precipitation or temperat...

published 2013 in Rangeland Ecology & Management

Using Spatial Statistics and Point-Pattern Simulations to Assess the Spatial Dependency Between Greater Sage-Grouse and Anthropogenic Features

by Gillan, Jeffrey K., Strand, Eva K., Karl, Jason W., Reese, Kerry P. and Laninga, Tamara

The greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus; hereafter, sage-grouse), a candidate species for listing under the Endangered Species Act, has experienced population declines across its range in the sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) steppe ecosystems of western North America. One factor contributing to the loss of habitat is the expanding human population with associated development and infrast...

published 2013 in Wildlife Society Bulletin