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One of the largest bibliographies of sage grouse literature available online

Description

The greater sage-grouse, a candidate species for listing under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973 has experienced population declines across its range in the sagebrush steppe ecosystems of western North America. Sage-grouse now occupy only 56% of their pre-settlement range, though they still occur in 11 western states and 2 Canadian provinces.

latest article added on August 2013

ArticleFirst AuthorPublished
Brood Habitats of Sympatric Sage Grouse and Columbian Sharp-Tailed Grouse in WyomingKLOTT, JH1990

Brood Habitats of Sympatric Sage Grouse and Columbian Sharp-Tailed Grouse in Wyoming

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

Habitats used by sympatric sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) and Columbian sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus) were compared. Sage grouse broods occurred most often (68%) in sagebrush (Artemisia spp.)-grass and sagebrush-bitterbrush (Purshia tridentata) habitats, whereas sharp-tailed grouse broods occurred most often (73%) in mountain shrub and sagebrush-snowberry (Symphoricarpos oreophilus) habitats. Mountain shrub and sagebrush-snowberry habitats were used by sharp- tailed grouse more (P < 0.05) than expected based on their availability. Broods of both species used areas within each habitat with less shrub cover than average for that habitat. Sharp-tailed grouse broods were associated with mountain snowberry, oniongrass (Melica spp.), and sulphur buckwheat (Eriogonum umbellatum). Sites used by sage grouse contained needle-and-thread (Stipa comata) and desert alyssum (Alyssum desertorum).

Authors

KLOTT, JH; LINDZEY, FG

Year Published

1990

Publication

The Journal of Wildlife Management

Locations
DOI

10.2307/3808905

Feeding Trials with Insects in the Diet of Sage Grouse ChicksJOHNSON, GD1990

Feeding Trials with Insects in the Diet of Sage Grouse Chicks

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

We evaluated the influence of insect reductions on survival of sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) chicks with 148 captive individuals aged 2-45 days when treatment began. Captive sage grouse chicks 21 days old required insects for optimum development. Quantity of insects in the diet was correlated with sage grouse chick survival and growth.

Authors

JOHNSON, GD; BOYCE, MS

Year Published

1990

Publication

The Journal of Wildlife Management

Locations
DOI

10.2307/3808906

SAGE GROUSE STATUS AND RECOVERY PLAN FOR STRAWBERRY VALLEY, UTAHWELCH, BL1990

SAGE GROUSE STATUS AND RECOVERY PLAN FOR STRAWBERRY VALLEY, UTAH

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

Since 1939, an estimated 3,000 sage grouse in Strawberry Valley, UT, have declined to some 180 birds, mainly because of reservoir construction and eradication of big sagebrush to promote livestock forage. A 4-year study of numbers and movements of radio-tagged grouse has provided the basis for a recovery program calling for rejuvenation of big sage-brush and forbs important to grouse, replacement of mating grounds lost to human activities, consideration of sage grouse biology in management decisions, and formation of a sage grouse recovery team.

Authors

WELCH, BL; WAGSTAFF, FJ; WILLIAMS, RL

Year Published

1990

Publication

USDA Forest Service Intermountain Research Station Research Paper

Locations
THE RED QUEEN VISITS SAGE GROUSE LEKSBOYCE, MS1990

THE RED QUEEN VISITS SAGE GROUSE LEKS

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

BOYCE, MS

Year Published

1990

Publication

American Zoologist

Locations
RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN BLOOD PARASITES, MATING SUCCESS AND PHENOTYPIC CUES IN MALE SAGE GROUSE CENTROCERCUS-UROPHASIANUSGIBSON, RM1990

RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN BLOOD PARASITES, MATING SUCCESS AND PHENOTYPIC CUES IN MALE SAGE GROUSE CENTROCERCUS-UROPHASIANUS

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

GIBSON, RM

Year Published

1990

Publication

American Zoologist

Locations
Mate choice in lekking sage grouse revisited: the roles of vocal display, female site fidelity, and copyingGibson, Robert M.1991

Mate choice in lekking sage grouse revisited: the roles of vocal display, female site fidelity, and copying

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

In lekking sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus), females exhibit relatively unanimous mate choice for particular males, but a satisfactory explanation for this unanimity has been elusive. We present analyses of mating distributions from two leks over 4 years that provide evidence for female choice based on differences in vocal display performance of males, the locations at which hens mated in the previous year, and the choices of other females (copying). The unanimity of female choice varied markedly among leks and years in correlation with changes in the mean numbers of hens that mated at the same time and hence the opportunity to copy. The results confirm that hens assess phenotypic traits of males directly but also indicate that the secondary tactics of site fidelity and copying are often important components of female choice. The occurrence of these secondary tactics has three implications: the variance in mating success among lek males will be a poor predictor of the intensity of sexual selection on specific traits; female preferences may generate more clustered dispersions of displaying males than predicted by hotspot settlement models; and direct assessment of males by females may be difficult or costly, a conclusion that supports adaptive models of sexual selection over a nonadaptive Fisherian process. [Behav Ecol 1991;2:165-180]

Authors

Gibson, Robert M.; Bradbury, Jack W.; Vehrencamp, Sandra L.

Year Published

1991

Publication

Behavioral Ecology

Locations
DOI

10.1093/beheco/2.2.165

Sage Grouse Use of Nest Sites in Southeastern IdahoCONNELLY, JW1991

Sage Grouse Use of Nest Sites in Southeastern Idaho

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

We investigated nest site selection by sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) in southeastern Idaho from 1987 to 1989. During 3 breeding seasons, 79% of 84 nest sites were found under sagebrush (Artemisia spp.). Nest success averaged 53% for grouse that used sagebrush and 22% for birds that used nonsagebrush nest sites. Total vegetative cover for sagebrush and nonsagebrush nest sites was similar. However, grass height was shorter (P = 0.01) at sagebrush compared to nonsagebrush nest sites. Herbaceous cover was important to nesting sage grouse but the relatively low nest success of nonsagebrush nest sites indicated they might provide less than optimal nesting habitat.

Authors

CONNELLY, JW; WAKKINEN, WL; APA, AD; REESE, KP

Year Published

1991

Publication

The Journal of Wildlife Management

Locations
DOI

10.2307/3808984

Preference of Wintering Sage Grouse for Big SagebrushWELCH, BL1991

Preference of Wintering Sage Grouse for Big Sagebrush

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

A study determined sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) preference for 3 subspecies and 9 accessions of big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt.). The subspecies were mountain big sagebrush (A. t. ssp. vaseyana Rydb. Beetle), Wyoming big sagebrush (A. t. ssp. wyomingensis Beetle and Young), and basin big sagebrush (A. t. ssp. tridentata Nutt.). Accessions were collected at various sites in Utah and established in a uniform garden. Eleven plants for each accession or 33 plants for each subspecies were planted at random on a 2.13-m grid for a total of 99 plants. An enclosure with a top was constructed. Six birds were captured and placed in the garden. Preference was measured by the number of bites taken during the study and by estimates of percentage of leaves eaten at the end of the study. Results, by order of preference, were mountain big sagebrush, Wyoming big sagebrush, and basin big sagebrush. Within the most preferred subspecies there was distinct preference among accessions as measured by bite counts. When the forage of preferred subspecies or accessions was exhausted, the birds readily ate other subspecies or accessions.

Authors

WELCH, BL; WAGSTAFF, FJ; ROBERSON, JA

Year Published

1991

Publication

Journal of Range Management

Locations
DOI

10.2307/4002745

GEOGRAPHIC-VARIATION AMONG SAGE GROUSE IN COLORADOHUPP, JW1991

GEOGRAPHIC-VARIATION AMONG SAGE GROUSE IN COLORADO

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

HUPP, JW; BRAUN, CE

Year Published

1991

Publication

Wilson Bulletin

Locations
Sage Grouse Nest Locations in Relation to LeksWAKKINEN, WL1992

Sage Grouse Nest Locations in Relation to Leks

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

We tested 2 predictions about the locations of nests of lek-forming species to evaluate a guideline developed to protect sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) nesting habitat. Sage grouse (n = 37) in southeastern Idaho did not attempt to nest midway between leks, as 1 hypothesis suggests. Neither was there evidence indicating that areas surrounding a lek are important for nesting, as a second hypothesis suggests. Because distribution of sage grouse nests was random with respect to lek location, nesting habitat protection based on either hypothesis affords no special protection for nests.

Authors

WAKKINEN, WL; REESE, KP; CONNELLY, JW

Year Published

1992

Publication

The Journal of Wildlife Management

Locations
DOI

10.2307/3808838

Recent Articles

The Secret Sex Lives of Sage-Grouse: Multiple Paternity and Intraspecific Nest Parasitism Revealed Through Genetic Analysis

by Bird, Krista, Aldridge, Cameron, Carpenter, Jennifer, Paszkowski, Cynthia, Boyce, Mark and Coltman, David

In lek-based mating systems only a few males are expected to obtain the majority of matings in a single breeding season and multiple mating is believed to be rare. We used 13 microsatellites to genotype greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) samples from 604 adults and 1206 offspring from 191 clutches (1999-2006) from Alberta, Canada, to determine paternity and polygamy (males and fema...

published 2013 in Behavioral Ecology

Seasonal Reproductive Costs Contribute to Reduced Survival of Female Greater Sage-grouse

by Blomberg, Erik, Sedinger, James, Nonne, Daniel and Atamian, Michael

Tradeoffs among demographic traits are a central component of life history theory. We investigated tradeoffs between reproductive effort and survival in female greater sage-grouse breeding in the American Great Basin, while also considering reproductive heterogeneity by examining covariance among current and future reproductive success. We analyzed survival and reproductive histories from 328 i...

published 2013 in Journal of Avian Biology


Greater Sage-Grouse and Severe Winter Conditions: Identifying Habitat for Conservation

by Dzialak, Matthew, Webb, Stephen, Harju, Seth, Olson, Chad, Winstead, Jeffrey and Hayden Wing, Larry

d Developing sustainable rangeland management strategies requires solution-driven research that addresses ecological issues within the context of regionally important socioeconomic concerns. A key sustainability issue in many regions of the world is conserving habitat that buffers animal populations from climatic variability, including seasonal deviation from long-term precipitation or temperat...

published 2013 in Rangeland Ecology & Management

Using Spatial Statistics and Point-Pattern Simulations to Assess the Spatial Dependency Between Greater Sage-Grouse and Anthropogenic Features

by Gillan, Jeffrey K., Strand, Eva K., Karl, Jason W., Reese, Kerry P. and Laninga, Tamara

The greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus; hereafter, sage-grouse), a candidate species for listing under the Endangered Species Act, has experienced population declines across its range in the sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) steppe ecosystems of western North America. One factor contributing to the loss of habitat is the expanding human population with associated development and infrast...

published 2013 in Wildlife Society Bulletin