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A bibliography of publications (theses, peer reviewed articles, gray literature and books) with sample-collections sites in the Coos Bay, Oregon area.

Description

We compiled a geo-referenced bibliography of research including theses, peer-reviewed articles, agency literature, and books having sample collection sites in and around Coos Bay, Oregon. Using Google Earth and GeoCommons we created a map that allows users such as visiting researchers, faculty, students, and local agencies to identify previous research conducted in their location of interest. There are links to specific citations and, if available, full-text documents. The interactive map allows users to zoom and filter.

latest article added on May 2014

ArticleFirst AuthorPublished
Physical and Functional Responses to Experimental Marsh Surface Elevation Manipulation in Coos Bay's South Slough.Cornu, Craig E.2002

Physical and Functional Responses to Experimental Marsh Surface Elevation Manipulation in Coos Bay's South Slough.

Keywords

coastal wetland restoration, diked wetlands, marsh elevation, marsh vegetation, subsidence, tidal channels, CBGB

Abstract

Dike material was used as fill to construct high, mid, and low intertidal elevations in a subsided marsh located in the South Slough National Estuarine Research Reserve, Oregon. Marsh surface elevation change (including fill consolidation and compression of the original marsh soils), vertical accretion, tidal channel development, emergent vegetation colonization, and fish use were monitored over 3 years. Significant marsh surface elevation loss was detected at all elevations, with fill consolidation accounting for 70% of the loss at the highest elevation. Vertical accretion averaged 0.19 cm/yr in the sparsely vegetated Kunz Marsh compared with 0.70 cm/yr at the densely vegetated reference sites. Tidal channel development was influenced as much by marsh surface gradient as by marsh surface elevation. Vegetation colonization was directly correlated with elevation, whereas density and species richness of fish was inversely correlated with elevation. Manipulating the marsh surface to mid-marsh elevations favors rapid vegetation colonization and facilitates vertical accretion-dominated tidal channel development. Low marsh elevations result in initially slower developing vegetation colonization and channel development but are more beneficial to fish during the early stages of marsh recovery. High marsh elevations appear to sacrifice tidal channel development and associated fish access for rapid vegetation colonization.

Authors

Cornu, Craig E. and Steven Sadro.

Year Published

2002

Publication

Restoration Ecology

Locations
DOI

10.1046/j.1526-100X.2002.01035.x

Non-target effects of invasive species management: beachgrass, birds, and bulldozers in coastal dunesZarnetske, Phoebe L.2010

Non-target effects of invasive species management: beachgrass, birds, and bulldozers in coastal dunes

Keywords

Ammophila arenaria, Ammophila breviligulata, beachgrass, Charadrius alexandrinus nivosus, coastal dune, ecosystem engineer, invasive species, Oregon, restoration, targeted management, threatened species, Washington, CBGB

Abstract

Alteration of ecosystem processes by invasive species can lead to the decline of native species. Management actions targeted at removing these invaders and restoring native populations may have knock-on effects on non-target native species and ecosystems. For example, coastal dunes in the Pacific Northwest of North America are nearly monocultures of the introduced beach grasses, Ammophila arenaria and Ammophila breviligulata. These invasive grasses have converted open, low-lying sand dunes with a sparse covering of native plants to tall, densely-vegetated ridges dominated by the two invaders. As a result, the critical open-sand habitat of the federally threatened Western Snowy plover (Charadrius alexandrinus nivosus) has declined along with populations of several native dune plant species. Here we investigate how nearly 20 years of management targeted at the removal of Ammophila for plover recovery are impacting native plant species and dune morphology along 500 km of coastline in Oregon and Washington, USA. Despite increased plovers and decreased Ammophila in treated areas, plover habitat restoration also has had the unintentional effect of reducing the richness and abundance of native dune plants. Additionally, frequent Ammophila removal has prevented the re-establishment of the natural disturbance regime and dune function. Based on these findings, we suggest that the Pacific Northwest coastal dune ecosystem would benefit from a more synthetic community-wide management approach.

Authors

Zarnetske, Phoebe L., Seabloom, Eric W. and Hacker, Sally D.

Year Published

2010

Publication

Ecosphere

Locations
DOI

10.1890/ES10-00101.1

This article contributed by:

Ecological Society of America

A bioassay for the toxicity of sediment to marine macrobenthosSwartz, R.1979

A bioassay for the toxicity of sediment to marine macrobenthos

Keywords

CBGB

Abstract

A bioassay has been developed to determine the acute toxicity of the settleable phase of dredged material to the marine benthos. Five benthic invertebrates representing different taxonomic and trophic positions were allowed to acclimate to control (nonpolluted) sediment and were then covered by a layer of either test or control sediment. Mean survival after 10 days of exposure was significantly different from the control for sediment from the Duwamish River (Wash.), Houston Ship Channel (Tex.), Bailey Creek (Va.), and the Raritan River (N.J.), but there was no significant difference for sediment from Coos Bay and the Skipanon River (Oreg.). There were substantial interspecific differences in survival among the five test species. The most sensitive species was the infaunal amphipod, Paraphoxus epistomus.

Authors

Swartz, R., W. DeBen, F. Cole

Year Published

1979

Publication

Journal (Water Pollution Control …

Locations
Additional Information:

http://www.jstor.org/stable/25039930

This article contributed by:

Oregon Institute of Marine Biology

A brief description of a subtidal sabellariid(Polychaeta) reef on the southern Oregon coast.Posey, M.1984

A brief description of a subtidal sabellariid(Polychaeta) reef on the southern Oregon coast.

Keywords

CBGB

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

Posey, M., A. Pregnall, R. Graham

Year Published

1984

Publication

Pacific Science

Locations
Additional Information:

http://www.researchgate.net/publication/29736476_A_Brief_Description_of_a_Subtidal_Sabellariid_(Polychaeta)_Reef_on_the_Southern_Oregon_Coast/file/3deec52741f912eabc.pdf

This article contributed by:

Oregon Institute of Marine Biology

A comparison of population structure in black rockfish ( Sebastes melanops ) as determined with otolith microchemistry and microsatellite DNAMiller, J.A.2005

A comparison of population structure in black rockfish ( Sebastes melanops ) as determined with otolith microchemistry and microsatellite DNA

Keywords

CBGB

Abstract

The black rockfish (Sebastes melanops) is a long-lived (≤50 years) viviparous species with an extended pelagic larval period (3–5 months) and a broad continental distribution. Prolonged larval periods have been assumed to lead to widespread dispersal resulting in minimal population structure. We tested this assumption by comparing otolith microchemistry and microsatellite DNA of adult black rockfish from four locations in Oregon and Washington. We observed significant differences among locations in element-to-Ca ratios (Mg:Ca, Mn:Ca, Zn:Ca, Sr:Ca, and Ba:Ca) at the otolith edge, which represented the last year of life. Discriminant function analysis, based on otolith element-to-Ca ratios classified, on average, 64% of the fish to collection location, suggesting that the majority of individuals from these locations did not mix. Using microsatellite DNA, we observed significant genetic differences among adults collected 340–460 km apart (FST = 0.018 ± 0.004). Using five and seven loci, 63% and 75% of the fish, respectively, were correctly assigned to collection location. These two techniques provided corroborative and complementary information on the population structure of S. melanops.

Authors

Miller, J.A., M.A. Banks, D. Gomez-Uchida, A.L. Shanks

Year Published

2005

Locations
DOI

10.1139/f05-133

Additional Information:

http://www.nrcresearchpress.com/doi/abs/10.1139/f05-133

This article contributed by:

Oregon Institute of Marine Biology

A Concentration of the Ratfish, Hydrolagus colliel Cape Arago, OregonJopson, H.G.M.1958

A Concentration of the Ratfish, Hydrolagus colliel Cape Arago, Oregon

Keywords

CBGB

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

Jopson, H.G.M.

Year Published

1958

Publication

Copeia

Locations
DOI

10.2307/1440606

Additional Information:

http://www.jstor.org/stable/1440606?origin=crossref

This article contributed by:

Oregon Institute of Marine Biology

A new species of large and highly contractile hydroid in the genus Candelabrum (Hydrozoa: Anthoathecatae) from southern Oregon, U.S.A.Hewitt, C.L.2001
A new species of Penitella (family Pholadidae) from Coos Bay, OregonEvans, J.1966

A new species of Penitella (family Pholadidae) from Coos Bay, Oregon

Keywords

CBGB

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

Evans, J., D. Fisher

Year Published

1966

Locations
Additional Information:

http://scholar.google.com/scholar?hl=en&btnG=Search&q=intitle:A+new+species+of+Penitella+(Family+Pholadidae)+from+Coos+Bay

This article contributed by:

Oregon Institute of Marine Biology

A non-feeding pilidium with apparent prototroch and telotroch.Maslakova, S.A.2012

A non-feeding pilidium with apparent prototroch and telotroch.

Keywords

CBGB

Abstract

The nemertean pilidium larva is a long-lived planktotrophic form which is challenging to homologize to other invertebrate larval forms. Here we report a reduced, lecithotrophic pilidium which superficially resembles a trochophore. We document the pilidium-like catastrophic metamorphosis of this larva, including devouring of the larval body. Sequences of COI and 16S rRNA show that this larva belongs to an undescribed lineiform species. This novel larval form highlights the long-standing question, is the trochophore a conserved larval ground-plan or a functional design arrived at by convergence?

Authors

Maslakova, S.A., G. von Dassow

Year Published

2012

Publication

Journal of experimental zoology. Part B, Molecular and developmental evolution

Locations
DOI

10.1002/jezb.22467

Additional Information:

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/jezb.22467/full

This article contributed by:

Oregon Institute of Marine Biology

A Study of bait seine fisheries of OregonHarry, G.Y.J.1951

A Study of bait seine fisheries of Oregon

Keywords

CBGB

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

Harry, G.Y.J.

Year Published

1951

Publication

Fish Commission of Oregon Research Briefs

Locations
This article contributed by:

Oregon Institute of Marine Biology

Recent Articles

Effects of Salinity on Survival of the Exotic Seagrass Zostera Japonica Subjected to Extreme High Temperature Stress

by Kaldy, J and Shafer, D

Zostera japonica is a non-indigenous seagrass that is expanding along the Pacific Coast of North America. The ecophysiology of this seagrass is poorly studied and management of the species is fragmented. This split-plot mesocosm experiment was designed to evaluate the response of Z. japonica to chronic, extreme temperature and salinity stress to facilitate development of models to predict poten...

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A Non-Feeding Pilidium with Apparent Prototroch and Telotroch.

by Maslakova, S

The nemertean pilidium larva is a long-lived planktotrophic form which is challenging to homologize to other invertebrate larval forms. Here we report a reduced, lecithotrophic pilidium which superficially resembles a trochophore. We document the pilidium-like catastrophic metamorphosis of this larva, including devouring of the larval body. Sequences of COI and 16S rRNA show that this larva bel...

published 2012 in Journal of experimental zoology. Part B, Molecular and developmental evolution


Continuous Growth Facilitates Feeding and Reproduction: Impact of Size on Energy Allocation Patterns for Organisms with Indeterminate Growth

by Lord, J

Environmental Determinants of Emergent Macrophyte Vegetation in Pacific Northwest Estuarine Tidal Wetlands

by Weilhoefer, C, Nelson, W, Clinton, P and Beugli, D

published 2012 in Estuaries and Coasts